Saturday, October 31, 2015

Sepia Saturday - Halloween



For this Sepia Saturday Suggestion lets look at some Halloween Snapshots that have accumulated over the years.

Oddly, although this is a popular subject for amateur photographers, there are very few Halloween themed snapshots in LOST GALLERY.

Let's start with one set of nine photographs, all Polaroid shots that apparently were from a Halloween party at a restaurant.

So today for Sepia Saturday, lets look at all the photographs in LOST GALLERY associated with Halloween!

Halloween Office Party

Halloween Office Party
Halloween Office Party
Halloween Office Party

Halloween Office Party
Halloween Office Party
Halloween Office Party

Halloween Office Party
Halloween Office Party at Taco Tico

A little research found that these party pictures were taken in a fast service restaurant called Taco Tico, an idea started by brothers Dan and Robin Foley. The first Taco Tico restaurant opened in 1962 in Wichita, Kansas. Sources vary but the idea apparently grew to several hundred locations, company units and franchises across Kansas, Oklahoma and Arkansas in just a few short years. The Foley brothers sold the entire company in 1988. It is an interesting sidelight that the first Pizza Hut restaurant had opened just four years earlier, in the same city, Wichita, Kansas.


Two kids in costume
Beard and a pipe
Halloween at Skate land

Halloween at the Roller Rink!

There are lots of photographs of people in costume in LOST GALLERY, but only these few seemed Halloween related.

Costume

Here's a big Halloween scene. It's about 60 children in Halloween costumes, ready for the Trick or Treat circuit of their neighborhoods.

Halloween


In costume again

Now, materialize back at the Sepia Saturday home page, and see what other spooky Halloween contributions you can find.


Bassingbourn 1944 384th Bomber Group, B17 landing
Long lost negatives taken during the winter of 1944-45 at Bassingbourn AAF base in England.

Area 51 and a Half Area 51 and a Half You are probably not authorized to see these.

Don't take my picture! Oh! You DID didn't you! completely unaware of the photographer This is a collection of photographs that disappear on the way home from the photo processing shop.


And don't miss
Cabinet Card Gallery
Square America
Tattered and Lost
Vernacular Photography
The best
FOUND PHOTOGRAPH
sites on the web.

And for postcards try
POSTCARDY
And see what's going on over at
Sepia Saturday!

All images are the property of Lost Gallery and the author. Permission must be granted for their use. All rights reserved.

THE KIDS Lesson one.
It is always a mystery how a photograph of any of these precious children could end up lost or abandoned. Here are a few. You will probably say "Ooh..." at least once.

Dee and the Business School Dee and the Business School
The beautiful Dee. A curious story; What do you see?

WHAT'S GOING ON HERE?
Neiffel and Helvetica Typehigh

"What are they doing?"

16 comments:

  1. My favorites are the girls dressed as flowers and the spooks on roller skates!

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    1. Thanks Kathy. You picked my favorites too.

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  2. Those black vinyl chairs were certainly common in restaurants of the 60s. I've never been to Kansas, but the restaurant looks so typical of the restaurants of my youth. Love the roller skaters. I doubt their masks would pass the safety standards today.

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    1. Thanks Wendy. You are sure right. I remember the vinyl chairs too. I worked as a youngster in a restaurant and I remember how heavy they were to stack on the tables each night so the floor could be vacuumed and mopped.

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  3. They didn't grow or sell those orange pumpkins here in Aus until very recently, but now you can get them in the supermarket just around Halloween time - I'll have to check if they are grown locally or imported from the USA.

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    1. Thanks Jo Featherston. It is the opposite here. The unusually sandy soil in Oklahoma is perfect for all types of melon and gourd plants. We see piles of watermelons, cantaloupes and pumpkins along the roadside for sale by local farmers. The pumpkin is quite popular at Halloween because of the "Headless Horseman" yarn but it is also found in pies around the November and December holidays.

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  4. That crowd of kids is from the golden age of Halloween trick-or-treatering when costumes were mostly homemade from the imagination (with a little help from mom.) In the golden age, businesses didn't play at Halloween, it was only a neighborhood thing. I believe the real purpose of having children dress up and go door to door is to teach them that strangers are not scary or threatening, but are instead welcoming and hospitable. Free candy for everyone!

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    1. Thanks Mike Brubaker. I too remember the days when it was a neighborhood celebration. That tradition has deteriorated badly over the decades after the crazies and the corporations took an interest. The sabotaging of some apples and candy some years ago changed the "treat" part of "Trick or Treat." And the corporations didn't hesitate to commercialize every part of it with ready- made costumes from some Chinese sweat-shop and pre-packaged candies and five-dollar greeting cards. We only had three packs of goblins come to our door this year and one of those was family from across town.

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  5. Love the spider! And I was thinking about what future humans might think of the past if they uncovered a collection of Halloween snapshots (and nothing else)!! These are great photos...

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    1. Thanks Deb Gould. That's an unsettling thought. I can see the headlines now: "Archaeologists uncover photographs from a very strange ancient civilization!" "People seemed obsessed with hiding their real faces!"

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  6. What a huge bunch of children - presumably they split up before visiting their neighbors or did they all descend on the same houses? .

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    1. Thanks Dara. Wouldn't that be a hoot! You open your door and your whole yard is full of children in costume screaming "Trick or Treat!" That WOULD be scary!

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  7. The photo of all the costumed kids lined up - in front of a school, I'm guessing? - reminds me of my Halloween days in elementary school. Our school was on a wide boulevard & for a half hour or so, part of it was shut down so all the school children could march up and down it showing off their costumes to parents and neighbors and other gathered spectators. I remember the event being a lot of fun.

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    1. Thanks La Nightingale. Oh that sounds like fun! I don't think our elementary schools had anything as fun as that. Perhaps it's a good thing that we are trying to swing the tradition away from having little children going door to door in the dark knocking on strangers doors. I don't know.

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  8. I agree with Dara - I actually find that mass of children the scariest picture of the lot! Great gallery too.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Little Nell. Herding that many children into a line must have been quite an accomplishment in itself. Having them all in costume is beyond my imagination.

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