Friday, June 30, 2017

19th Century Photographers - Joseph George Muenzer


This is a special page for a mounted portrait by a very interesting photographer from the collection of rfinch on Ancestry.com



from the collection of
rfinch on Ancestry.com

Joseph George Muenzer
(17 May 1881 - 26 Aug 1965)

There are lots of city directory listings telling where J D Muenzer worked as a photographer for most of his life.

From 1910 to 1923 the studio was at 319 Pennsylvania av se. He and his wife apparently lived at the studio until 1918 when their residence became 1513 25th se. Business listings for the studio at 319 Pennsylvania av se continue until 1923.

From 1924 the studio begins operating out of his residence at 1531 25th se until his death in 1965 at age 84.

The studio operates as Capitol Photo Service between 1928 and 1954; the rest of the time as Muenzer Studio. Imprints on photograph mountings should reflect this.

The photograph here was possibly done before the Capitol Photo Service days that started in 1927 and shortly after the studio opened in 1910. The style of the mounting probably would put it in the later years, after 1920.

Washington (CD) Times - 29 May 1915






Most often a found photograph is of unknown people by an unknown photographer. Occasionally the names of the people in a photograph are written on it later. But, very seldom do we ever learn the name of the photographer.

In the case of the Cabinet Card

and the Carte de Viste (CDV) the photographer's name or studio name is often included as part of the mounting. It is sometimes at the narrow end of the mounting board on the front and sometimes it is given in an elaborate fashion on the reverse of the card.


These pages of the LOST GALLERY will present all of the CABINET CARDS in the collection where the photographer is known.

The name of the photographer will be repeated in the text so that it can be included in internet searches by Google and Bing and the rest.

As more information about the photographer emerges it will be added here.

This is a project in progress. If you don't find something here on a photographer you are researching, check back again.


Below are the links to the alphabetized pages in the LOST GALLERY cabinet card collection.

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

U

V

W

X

Y

Z

There are MANY photographs on each page so they might load slowly.


A few additional ways to date cabinet cards

Card stock
1866–1880: square, lightweight mount
1880–1890: square, heavy weight card stock
1890s: scalloped edges

Card colors
1866–1880:
thin, light weight card stock in white, off white or light cream; white and light colours were used in later years, but generally on heavier card stock

1880–1890:
different colors for face and back of mounts

1882–1888:
matte-finish front, with a creamy-yellow, glossy back

(From WIki)

Borders
1866–1880: red or gold rules, single and double lines
1884–1885: wide gold borders
1885–1892: gold beveled edges
1889–1896: rounded corner rule of single line
1890s on: Embossed borders and/or lettering

(From Wiki)



For more information on dating Cabinet Cards see PHOTOTREE

Lettering
1866–1879 Photographer name and address often printed small and neatly just below the image, and/or studio name printed small on back.

1880s on: Large, ornate text for photographer name and address, especially in cursive style. Studio name often takes up the entire back of the card.

Late 1880s–90s Gold text on black card stock

1890s on: embossed studio name or other embossed designs

(From Wiki)

Go back to THE MAIN INDEX PAGE
There are now more than 8,000 photographs in the Lost Gallery.
Or try out the NEW BACK PAGE INDEX


Thursday, June 29, 2017

19th Century Photographers - Moore and Morris


This is a special page for a CDV by a very interesting photographer from the collection of rfinch on Ancestry.com



from the collection of
rfinch on Ancestry.com

from the collection of
rfinch on Ancestry.com
Millard Filmore Kelly (Jul 1851 - 13 Jan 1911)
William Wilson Morris (7 Jul 1845 - 14 Jun 1911)

It is a possibility that M F Kelly and Wilson Morris worked together very briefly in 1880 under the name “Moore and Morris” but there is very little documentation to support it.

On 2 Jun 1880 Wilson Morris, artist, is listed with wife Clementine, artist, and son Elmore, age 7 years, in Lake, Ashland, OH, living with his parents.

Then on 29 Jun 1880 Wilson Morris, photographer is listed with wife Celentine, keeping house, (no son Elmore shown) now living next door to M E Kelly in Peru, IN.

It’s about 200 miles between the two cities.

It should be noted too that Moore was the maiden name of Morris’s first wife. Ella Moore died five months after the birth of son Elmore in 1872. In the 1910 census and again on his 1917 draft card, Elmore Morris renames himself Elmoore Morris.
It is rare to be counted twice in a US federal census but not impossible. It’s not the first photographer in LOST GALLERY to be found twice in the same census. In 1930 I A Byarlay was counted at home and then again in his studio in the same city, about three weeks later.

There were no city directories in either Peru or Lake and no area newspaper records are available for that period, limiting further documentation.

Did Millard Fillmore Kelly use the name Moore, a derivation of his middle name? Or was it a salute to Wilson Morris’s first wife? A search for a photographer named Moore in the area turned up nothing, so this is the best scenario for now.

By 1889, Kelly was living in Pierce, WA. By 1885, Morris was back in Lake, OH.

So for now, until more documentation is found, it appears that Millard Fillmore Kelly and W Wilson Morris might have teamed up in late June of 1880 as “Moore and Morris” to do this CDV.

The following timeline shows much more information found on Kelly than on Morris
continued on next row


Timeline combined for:
Millard Filmore Kelly (Jul 1851 - 13 Jan 1911)
William Wilson Morris (7 Jul 1845 - 14 Jun 1911)

(Note: names are spelled here as they are on the documents outlined.)
1845 Jul 07
William Wilson Morris as born in Lake, OH
1851 Jul
Millard Filmore Kelly
1872 Jul 16
W W Morris marries Ella Moore in Fulton County, IN
1873 Mar 26
W W Morris’s son Elmore Morris born in Fulton, IN
1873 Aug 31
W W Morris’s wife Ella Moore dies in Fulton, IN
1874 Jan 08
W W Morris marries Clemintine D Parker
1875 Jul 07
M F Kelly marries Luella Atcheson in Wabash, IN
1878 Aug 24
M F Kelly’s son Henry Claude Kelly is born
1880 Jun 02
US census Lake, OH, W W Morris as artist; wife Clementine also listed as artist; son Elmore, Age 7 is listed also
1880 Jun 29
US census Peru, IN, W W Morris as photographer; wife Celentine listed as keeping house; son Elmore is NOT listed

1880 Jun 29
US census Peru, IN, M E Kelly as photographer; wife Ella Kelly as keeping house
1885 May
W W Morris’s Son Arthur A Morris is born in Lake, OH
1889 Apr 01
Washington State territorial census Pierce, WA, M F Kelly as artist; wife Luella and son Claude listed
1890
Tacoma, WA, city directory M F Kelly as photographer at 1111 s “E”; res 1416 Tacoma av
1891 & 1892
Tacoma, WA, city directory M F Kelly as photographer at 1111 s “E”; res 1414 Tacoma av
1893
Tacoma, WA, city directory M F Kelly as photographer at 1516 Jefferson; res 141 s Tacoma (probably a misprint)
1895
Tacoma, WA, city directory M F Kelly as photographer; res 1414 s Tacoma av
1897
Tacoma, WA, city directory M F Kelly as photographer at 714 s “L”
1900
Tacoma, WA, city directory M F Kelly business not listed; res 714 s “L”
1900 Jun 05
US census M F Kelly (Kelley) as photographer; wife Lou, son H Claude; res 714 s “L”
1900 Jun 13
US census W W Morris as dealer in musical merchandise
1901
Tacoma, WA, city directory M F Kelly as photographer at 714 s “L”
1903
Tacoma, WA, city directory M F Kelly as “helper” at PSD&M; res 714 s “L” (PSD&M is unknown)
1910 May 02
US census W W Morris as "own income" while son Arthur is a "commercial trader" for pianos; Morris's son Elmore renames himself Elmoore Morris
1911 Jan 13
M F Kelly dies (suicide) in Yakima, WA, is buried in Tacoma, WA
1911 Jun 14
W W Morris dies in Loudonville, OH




Most often a found photograph is of unknown people by an unknown photographer. Occasionally the names of the people in a photograph are written on it later. But, very seldom do we ever learn the name of the photographer.

In the case of the Cabinet Card
and the Carte de Viste (CDV) the photographer's name or studio name is often included as part of the mounting. It is sometimes at the narrow end of the mounting board on the front and sometimes it is given in an elaborate fashion on the reverse of the card.


These pages of the LOST GALLERY will present all of the CABINET CARDS in the collection where the photographer is known.

The name of the photographer will be repeated in the text so that it can be included in internet searches by Google and Bing and the rest.
As more information about the photographer emerges it will be added here.

This is a project in progress. If you don't find something here on a photographer you are researching, check back again.

Below are the links to the alphabetized pages in the LOST GALLERY cabinet card collection.
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
There are MANY photographs on each page so they might load slowly.

A few additional ways to date cabinet cards
Card stock
1866–1880: square, lightweight mount
1880–1890: square, heavy weight card stock
1890s: scalloped edges

Card colors
1866–1880:
thin, light weight card stock in white, off white or light cream; white and light colours were used in later years, but generally on heavier card stock

1880–1890:
different colors for face and back of mounts

1882–1888:
matte-finish front, with a creamy-yellow, glossy back

(From WIki)
Borders
1866–1880: red or gold rules, single and double lines
1884–1885: wide gold borders
1885–1892: gold beveled edges
1889–1896: rounded corner rule of single line
1890s on: Embossed borders and/or lettering

(From Wiki)



For more information on dating Cabinet Cards see PHOTOTREE
Lettering
1866–1879 Photographer name and address often printed small and neatly just below the image, and/or studio name printed small on back.

1880s on: Large, ornate text for photographer name and address, especially in cursive style. Studio name often takes up the entire back of the card.

Late 1880s–90s Gold text on black card stock

1890s on: embossed studio name or other embossed designs

(From Wiki)
Go back to THE MAIN INDEX PAGE
There are now more than 8,000 photographs in the Lost Gallery.
Or try out the NEW BACK PAGE INDEX

Monday, June 19, 2017

Photographers of the 19th Century - Benjamin William Craven


This is a special page for three tintypes by a very interesting photographer from the collection of rfinch on Ancestry.com



from the collection of
rfinch on Ancestry.com

from the collection of
rfinch on Ancestry.com

from the collection of
rfinch on Ancestry.com

reverse of tintypes on the left, showing the photographer's stamp.

Benjamin William Craven
(1845 - 1876)

Sources, US census, Newspaper quotes courtesy of the Fulton County Library
Timeline
1845 Feb 17
B W Craven born in Indiana
1860 Aug 06
US census as farmer living with parents
1868 Jul 09
Rochester (IN) Union Spy - SCHOOL REPORT. Ben Craven mentioned as student in Advanced Department
1869 Apr 08
Rochester (IN) Union Spy - SCHOOL REPORT-school in District No. 1, Liberty Township, Dec 7, 1869 and ending Mar 27, 1869 - Ben Craven mentioned as teacher
1870 Jun 02
US census as school teacher, living with parents

1870 Aug 12
Rochester (IN) Union Spy - B. W. CRAVEN has just returned from Minnesota...
1870 Nov 11
Rochester (IN) Union Spy - THE ROCHESTER GRADED SCHOOL. The fall term... closed Friday, Nov. 4th. The school for the past six months has been under the supervision of Prof. C. T. WOOD... examinations (by Prof. Wood and Mr. CRAVEN) ..
1874 May 30
Rochester (IN) Sentinel - BEN CRAVEN, our city photographer, has been in very poor health for a long time, and with a hope of improving it, he, in company with his mother, started for Minnesota on Tuesday, where he will remain during the summer season..
1874 Jun 11
Rochester (IN) Union Spy - THEO. SWIHART is running the CRAVEN picture gallery, and is doing some good work.

1874 Jul 04
Rochester (IN) Sentinel - BEN CRAVEN had been suffering all winter with lung disease, and when the warm weather came on he concluded to go to Minnesota to recover his health. A letter received from him recently is to the effect that he has greatly improved in health, and will in a short time be fully restored...
1874 Sep 17
Rochester (IN) Union-spy - Mr. WILL CRAVEN, the photographer, who went west for his health, last spring, is reported very much improved and will soon return.
1874 Oct 10
Rochester (IN) Sentinel - BEN CRAVEN has returned from his long visit to Minnesota very much improved in health, and may in the future be found at his Art Gallery...

1874 Oct 24
Rochester (IN) Sentenel - C. T. SWIHART is fully prepared to put up life-sized pictures in the highest style of the art... enlarging ordinary pictures to life-size, and finishing them up in colors... call on him at Craven's picture gallery.
1875 Jan 23
Rochester (IN) Sentinel - “Declining health has induced BEN CRAVEN to sell a two-thirds interest in his photograph gallery to I. W. BROWN”.
1875 Jan 30
Rochester (IN) Sentinel - Mr. CRAVEN has sold his entire interest in the SPOHN BUILDING to I. W. BROWN. He gets possession of it the 15th of next month, and will have it for rent .
1875 Feb 27
Rochester (IN) Sentinel - BEN CRAVEN has closed out his photograph gallery


1875 Mar 12
Rochester (IN) Union Spy - CRAVEN, the photographer, is confined to his bed..
1876 Jan 28
B W Craven dies of consumption (tuberculosis), just two weeks before his 31 birthday

From these notations it could be deduced that B W Craven was a photographer for only about five or 6 years, between about 1871 and his death in 1876. And it appears his severe illness might have made his active years even shorter.


These two photographs are said to be of Benjamin William Craven himself. They were found on research sites.



Most often a found photograph is of unknown people by an unknown photographer. Occasionally the names of the people in a photograph are written on it later. But, very seldom do we ever learn the name of the photographer.

In the case of the Cabinet Card

and the Carte de Viste (CDV) the photographer's name or studio name is often included as part of the mounting. It is sometimes at the narrow end of the mounting board on the front and sometimes it is given in an elaborate fashion on the reverse of the card.


These pages of the LOST GALLERY will present all of the CABINET CARDS in the collection where the photographer is known.

The name of the photographer will be repeated in the text so that it can be included in internet searches by Google and Bing and the rest.

As more information about the photographer emerges it will be added here.

This is a project in progress. If you don't find something here on a photographer you are researching, check back again.


Below are the links to the alphabetized pages in the LOST GALLERY cabinet card collection.

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

U

V

W

X

Y

Z

There are MANY photographs on each page so they might load slowly.


A few additional ways to date cabinet cards

Card stock
1866–1880: square, lightweight mount
1880–1890: square, heavy weight card stock
1890s: scalloped edges

Card colors
1866–1880:
thin, light weight card stock in white, off white or light cream; white and light colours were used in later years, but generally on heavier card stock

1880–1890:
different colors for face and back of mounts

1882–1888:
matte-finish front, with a creamy-yellow, glossy back

(From WIki)

Borders
1866–1880: red or gold rules, single and double lines
1884–1885: wide gold borders
1885–1892: gold beveled edges
1889–1896: rounded corner rule of single line
1890s on: Embossed borders and/or lettering

(From Wiki)



For more information on dating Cabinet Cards see PHOTOTREE

Lettering
1866–1879 Photographer name and address often printed small and neatly just below the image, and/or studio name printed small on back.

1880s on: Large, ornate text for photographer name and address, especially in cursive style. Studio name often takes up the entire back of the card.

Late 1880s–90s Gold text on black card stock

1890s on: embossed studio name or other embossed designs

(From Wiki)

Go back to THE MAIN INDEX PAGE
There are now more than 8,000 photographs in the Lost Gallery.
Or try out the NEW BACK PAGE INDEX


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