Thursday, December 1, 2016

Cabinet Card Photographers of the 19th Century U - V


Most often a found photograph is of unknown people by an unknown photographer. Occasionally the names of the people in a photograph are written on it later. But, very seldom do we ever learn the name of the photographer.

In the case of the Cabinet Card and the Carte de Viste (CDV) the photographer's name or studio name is often included as part of the mounting. It is sometimes at

the narrow end of the mounting board on the front and sometimes it is given in an elaborate fashion on the reverse of the card.

These pages of the LOST GALLERY will present all of the CABINET CARDS in the collection where the photographer is known.

The name of the photographer will be

repeated in the text so that it can be included in internet searches by Google and Bing and the rest.

As more information about the photographer emerges it will be added here.

This is a project in progress. If you don't find something here on a photographer you are researching, check back again.


Below are the links to the alphabetized pages in the LOST GALLERY cabinet card collection.

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

U

V

W

X

Y

Z

There are MANY photographs on each page so they might load slowly.



Cabinet Card woman
Photographer: Urbanowicz
4852 Ashland Ave.
Chicago

Zacbaryoez K Urbanowicz had his name rearranged a few times in his lifetime. Whether by intent or misspelling is unknown but the shifting does make his history a bit difficult to follow. He was also ten years younger than most photographers of the cabinet card era.

Cabinet Card family
Photographer: Urbanowicz
4852 Ashland Ave.
Chicago

Waldyslaw, Zacbaryoez, Zacharias, Zachary, Zachery, Urban, Urbanowies, Urbanowicz was a photographer and later in life, a shoe salesman. In many listings, his occupation, his address or the names of his wife and daughter are all that shows it is the same person.

Chicago, IL, city directories, for many of the years 1916 through 1930, covered only established business categories and mid-town buildings, while residential areas were omitted. Since Urbanowics apparently worked out of his home or for another studio, he does not appear in city directories for most of those years. He was a photographer without a studio most of his career.

In 1913, 1914, 1915 and 1917 city directories and the 1920 US census, he is listed at 4852 South Ashland which was apparently his residence too. In 1928, a rare street by street Chicago city directory shows another photographer is listed at that address.

Zacharyoes K. Urbanowicz
(1873 - 28 Feb 1964)

1873
born in Poland
1880 or 1890
arrival in US (depending on source)
1904
as photographer at 4833 s Ashland, Chicago, IL
1910
at 4841 s Ashland, Chicago, IL
1911
as photographer at 4841 S Ashland
1911
daughter Leone born in Chicago, IL

1912
NOT in Chicago city directory
1913-1915
as photographer at 4852 s Ashland
1916
NOT in Chicago city directory
1917
as photographer at 4852 S Ashland; also wife Veronica listed as photographer at 8907 Commercial st.
1918-1919
NOT in Chicago city directory
1920
(US census) at 4852 s Ashland
1921-1927
NOT in Chicago city directory
1928
another photographer is at 4852: Michl and Martha Jelgiwics
1929
no directory available
1930
as photographer at 8907 Commercial, Chicago, IL
1935
at 8907 Commercial, Chicago, IL
1940
as shoe salesman at 8907 Commercial, Chicago, IL
1964
dies in Chicago, IL at age 91

The cabinet card here must have been done between about 1913 and 1920, and certainly before 1928.



Carl Julius and Lina Vahlteich
John M. Huey and Minnie
Photographer: Vahlteich
443 Sedgwick St. Chicago

There are many documents establishing Julius Vahlteich and Carl (Karl) Julius Vahltich but never together. Is it the Superman/Clark Kent logic? If they are never seen together, they must be the same person?

Carl Julius, after a career in controversial German politics, emigrates, not wholly by choice, to the US, 26 Jun 1881 and so does Lina Vahlteich apparently at the same time on the same boat. Both name the “Greek” as the passenger ship on which they arrived in New York. A passenger manifest from the ship shows Mr. Julius Vahlteich and Mrs ditto ditto (no name)…ages 41 and 20. Birth dates from other sources confirm these ages right for Carl Julius and Lina in June of 1881.

The Vahlteich “husband/wife” team of photographers however, exists in only one document out of more than thirty found mentioning them. In the Chicago Lakeside city directory they are shown at the same address, 292 North Avenue, Chicago, as photographer/artist.

All other mentions of Lina Vahlteich have her living alone or with a couple boarders. Lina was probably pronounced “Lee-Nah” resulting in being spelled “Lena” in some documents. But she spells it Lina when she signs papers.

Her marital status varies from document to document. In the 1900 US census she is living alone but “married” and in 1910 she is still living alone but then she is “Single”.

In the 1920 US census she is now a “widow” although the census date was 22 Jan 1920, and Carl Julius Vahlteich didn’t die until 15 Feb 1920. This would make one suspect again that Carl Julius and Julius might have been two separate people. But considering all the other inconsistencies in their records, this is probably just another one.

Census details show Lina as “no occupation” from 1916 to her death in 1937.

In the period from about 1890 to 1920, Lina and Julius don’t seem to be living together; in fact Julius does not even appear anywhere in every census and city directory that Lina does.

Documents on Carl Julius Vahlteich and Julius Vahlteich are numerous but there is little to show that the two names are the same person.

Only in the case of his two passport applications, ten years apart, do the two meet. The first in 1903 is signed Carl Julius Vahlteich and the second in 1913 is signed Julius Vahlteich. Otherwise the two signatures appear identical. Also the facts stated on the two applications are identical.

It is clear that Julius did little if anything in the photography business as he was quite active in politics and in 1906 became editor of New Yorker Volkszeitung the longest-running German language daily labor newspaper in the United States of America, established in 1878.

His activism was probably why he does not consistently appear in city directories and the census. He apparently moved around a lot. In 1891 there was a disruption in the Turnerbund, a German social organization in the US. Carl Julius was a member of a Chicago chapter of the Turners. The local chapter did not like his outspoken anarchistic political views and wanted to oust him.

Continued next row---


That was against the National Turners bylaws however. The Chicago chapter then disassociated with the National group so they could vote Carl Julius out. This was after all, basically why he was banished from Germany in 1881. For instance, in 1873 to 1875, he worked as a paid agitator of the SDAP (Social Democratic Worker’s Party). The growing political climate in Germany didn’t want to deal with an anarchist.

Julius Vahlteich
(30 Dec 1845 - Jan 1920)
Lina Vahlteich
(15 Dec 1862 - 12 Dec 1937)

1839 Jan 30
Julius born in Germany (according to his passport application)
1845 Dec 30
Julius born in Germany (according to Lina’s citizenship Petition)Probably an error
1862 Dec 15
Lina born in Dresden, Germany (according to Lina’s citizenship Petition)
1880
from Lina’s citizenship Petition - Julius and Lina marry in Leipzig, Germany

1879-1881
No Chicago city directory available
1882
Lina’s citizenship Petition - Both immigrate to US
1882
NO Vahlteich in Chicago city directory
1885
Chicago city directory - Julius as photographer at 292 North av; Lina not shown
1886 Sep
voter registration (1890) Naturalized this year
1887
Chicago Lakeside city directory Lina and Julius as photographer & ARTIST at 292 North av
1888
Chicago city directory - Julius as photographer at 292 North av; no Lina;
1889
Chicago city directory - Julius as photographer at 292 North av; no Lina
1890
Voter registration Julius at 443 Sedgwick (res for 7 months this address)(naturalization Sept 1886)
1900 Jun 05
US census Lina as head of household; 443 Sedgwick; photographer (listed as MARRIED but living alone)

1904 Dec 15
Mrs Lina Vahlteich as photographer at 1458 Halstead
1906
Annual Factory Review - Mrs Lena Vahlteich as photographer at 1458 Halstead with 2 employees
1908
Annual Factory Review - Lena Vahlteich as photographer at 1458 Halstead
1910 Apr 26
US census Lina as photographer at 2931 Halstead st - as SINGLE
1914
Chicago city directory - Mrs. Lina Vahlteich as photographer 2931 N Halstead; res 743 Oakdale ave (Julius and John R. at 732 Addison)
1915
Chicago city directory - Mrs. Lena Vahlteich as photographer 2931 Halstead
1916
Chicago city directory - Not in business section, no residential section issued
1917
Chicago city directory - Mrs Lena Vahlteich res 743 Oakdale not in bus pages

1918 -1920
Chicago city directory - Lina Not in business section; residential section not published
1920
Jan 22 US census Mrs Lena as WIDOWED at 743 Oakdale Ave Immigrated 1880
1920 Feb 15
Carl Julius Vahltech dies at age 74
1930
US census Lina widowed; as no occupation at 5302 Lakewood av
1936
Declaration of intention naturalization Lina as retired 5302 Lakewood ave
1937
Lina dies in Chicago at age 74

The cabinet cards here were probably done by Lina Vahlteich between about 1890 and 1900.

Julius seemed to have other things to do.



Portrait
Photographer: Harman & Verner
Cor. 4th & Washington Ave. Bay City, Mich.

James C. Verner
(7 Jun 1868 - 1 Nov 1912)
1868
born in Montreal, Quebec, Canada
1875
arrival in US from Montreal, Canada
1877
age 19 partners with Harman at 212 Water, Bay City, MI
1882
marries Amelia Verner
1883-1884
Harman & Verner at 910 N Water
1886-1887
Harman & Verner at 914 N Water
1889-1911
Harman & Verner at 4th & Washington or 924 N Washington
1912
Verner dies at age 54 in Bay City, MI

This cabinet card would have been finished sometime between 1889 and 1911.


A few additional ways to date cabinet cards

Card stock
1866–1880: square, lightweight mount
1880–1890: square, heavy weight card stock
1890s: scalloped edges

Card colors
1866–1880:
thin, light weight card stock in white, off white or light cream; white and light colours were used in later years, but generally on heavier card stock

1880–1890:
different colors for face and back of mounts

1882–1888:
matte-finish front, with a creamy-yellow, glossy back

(From WIki)

Borders
1866–1880: red or gold rules, single and double lines
1884–1885: wide gold borders
1885–1892: gold beveled edges
1889–1896: rounded corner rule of single line
1890s on: Embossed borders and/or lettering

(From Wiki)



For more information on dating Cabinet Cards see PHOTOTREE

Lettering
1866–1879 Photographer name and address often printed small and neatly just below the image, and/or studio name printed small on back.

1880s on: Large, ornate text for photographer name and address, especially in cursive style. Studio name often takes up the entire back of the card.

Late 1880s–90s Gold text on black card stock

1890s on: embossed studio name or other embossed designs

(From Wiki)


Below are the links to the alphabetized pages in the LOST GALLERY cabinet card collection.

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

U

V

W

X

Y

Z

There are MANY photographs on each page so they might load slowly.

Go back to THE MAIN INDEX PAGE
There are now more than 8,000 photographs in the Lost Gallery.
Or try out the NEW BACK PAGE INDEX






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