Thursday, December 1, 2016

Cabinet Card Photographers of the 19th Century - I - J


Please note:
As of September 2017 this series will no longer be updated here.
All content has been transferred to a new site called
Cabinet Card Photographers
All future additions will be made there.

Most often a found photograph is of unknown people by an unknown photographer. Occasionally the names of the people in a photograph are written on it later. But, very seldom do we ever learn the name of the photographer.

In the case of the Cabinet Card and the Carte de Viste (CDV) the photographer's name or studio name is often included as part of the mounting. It is sometimes at

the narrow end of the mounting board on the front and sometimes it is given in an elaborate fashion on the reverse of the card.

These pages of the LOST GALLERY will present all of the CABINET CARDS in the collection where the photographer is known.

The name of the photographer will be

repeated in the text so that it can be included in internet searches by Google and Bing and the rest.

As more information about the photographer emerges it will be added here.

This is a project in progress. If you don't find something here on a photographer you are researching, check back again.


Below are the links to the alphabetized pages in the LOST GALLERY cabinet card collection.

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

U

V

W

X

Y

Z

There are MANY photographs on each page so they might load slowly.




Cabinet Card baby
Photographer: Ingles'
South side of square
Gainseville, Texas

Elizabeth Ingle
(Nov 1874 - )

Records have been found to show that Elizabeth Ingle and husband Henry lived and worked at 16 ½ Main, Gainesville, TX, from 1888 to 1915. Elizabeth is listed as photographer in the city directories for 1907, 1910, 1913 and 1917, the only directories available, but as no occupation in the US census of 1900 and 1910.

In the 1900 US census and all four of the city directories Henry Ingle is shown as “physician” but the 1910 US census and his death certificate show him as “dentist”.

In April through June of 1888, Henry ran an ad several times describing himself as “physician” and keeping up his “dental practice” also. Photography is not mentioned.

An odd item in the Gainesville Daily Hesperian notes that Elizabeth Ingle died on February 22 of that year. Obviously she did not. It is also doubtful that there were two women of the same name, living in the small town of Gainesville, TX, at the same time.

Henry dies in 1917, age 83, leaving Elizabeth a 42 year old widow. The 1920 US census shows 8 year old niece Bessie Lumley living with Elizabeth who is listed again as photographer at 16 north Main. Sometime after 1920, Elizabeth and Bessie move to Seminole, OK. The 1930 US census shows Elizabeth and Bessie living in Seminole, but with no occupation.

The cabinet card on the left must have been finished between1907 and 1920 or close to that period. Note the name is imprinted on the card as “Ingles’” with an apostrophe.

Gainesville Daily Hesperian - 21 Apr 1888


Gainesville Daily Hesperian - 8 May 1888

Gainesville Daily Hesperian - 06 Jun 1888

Gainesville Daily Hesperian - 15 Oct 1891

Unfortunately, not every issue of this paper is available so none of these stories can be followed.


Gainesville Daily Hesperian - 28 February 1892

Daily Hesperian - 05 May 1896

Daily Hesperian - 27 Jan 1897


Cabinet Card woman with hat
Photographer: W. R. Ireland
West Side Square
Holton, Kas.
Cabinet Card family of five
Photographer: W. R. Ireland
West Side Square
Holton, Kas

William R. Ireland (Feb 1862 - 26 Mar 1945)

W. R. Ireland was photographer for 62 years, according to one obituary, beginning in 1883. His studio was apparently always on the west side of the square in downtown Holton, KS.

From this it is concluded that he was active between 1883 and 1945. Judging from the clothing, the photograph at the far left was made about 1885 and the photograph, near left was finished close to 1910.


Man portrait
Photographer: Iron Cottage Studio
Gatesville, Texas

According to one example on eBay, the studio name at one time was Fitzgerald and Hoffman, Iron Cottage Studio, Gatesville, TX. Nothing further has been found.

EBay example below. Note the similarity in technique.



Cabinet Card man Portrait
Photographer: Jarrard
86 Calhoun Street
Fort Wayne, Ind.
(note: See Miner & Dexter listings at 44 Calhoun Street, Fort Wayne, Ind.)
On the reverse is written very lightly
Sabastian Onoger

Harry A Jarrard was found in the US Census four times, 1880, 1900, 1910 and 1920. At each of these enumerations, he couldn’t seem to remember his own age exactly and in the 1920 count even the location of his birth moves from Indiana to Ohio. Those dates are correspondingly, 1858, 1851, 1852 and 1864. But all other facts match: family, location, occupation.

There are several items in Indiana newspapers about Harry Jarrard and his wife Emma.

His death still remains undocumented exactly. He was still alive for the 1920 US census which was enumerated January 05 of the year. He must be presumed deceased by Feb 05 1921 when his wife was advertising her own studio, which she had not done before. Although Jarrard’s last will and testament was written and witnessed 21 Aug 1919, it was not registered in probate record until 18 Mar 1924 three years after his death.

Note also when dating work by Jarrard studio, the imprinted name probably continued after his death while his wife Emma was running the studio. The changing studio addresses should probably pinpoint the date.

Harry A. Jarrard (Feb 1853 - 1920)

1853
born in Indiana
1880
(US Census) In Elwood, Madison County, IN
1885 Sep 13
(Newspaper item) new studio “over Eckart’s meat store”
1886
(Newspaper item) Fort Wayne Sentinel says opened gallery in Huntington
1888 Feb 14
marriage to Emma Short in Allen County
1889
(Fort Wayne city directory) photographer at 66 Calhoun St.
1890 - 1896
(Fort Wayne city directory) photographer at 86 Calhoun St.
1897
(Fort Wayne city directory) photographer at 2 E Columbia Street
1900
(US Census) photographer at 2 E Columbia St. (later number changed to 102 E Columbia St.)
1901
(Fort Wayne city directory) photographer at 2 E Columbia St.

1903 - 1907
(Fort Wayne city directory) photographer at 607 Calhoun St.
1907 Mar 28
(Newspaper item) opens additional gallery in Monroeville, IN, Saturdays only
1909
(Fort Wayne city directory) photographer at 102 E Columbia
1910
(US Census) photographer at 102 E Columbia
1918 May 02
(Newspaper item) working at “Swain Gallery”
1919 Aug 19
actual date the last will was written
1920 Jan 03
(US Census) as photographer at Brookville, Franklin County, IN
1921 Nov 10
(Newspaper item) Emma Jarrard advertises her own studio
1929 Feb 14
(Newspaper item) notice of death of wife Emma, Feb. 5 in Chicago

The cabinet card at the left was probably done in 1886 before his move to 88 Calhoun Street.


Cabinet Card woman
Photographer: ?. M. Johnson
Columbus, Kansas

The first initial is incomplete on this cabinet card and unfortunately there were a lot of photographers named Johnson in the cabinet card era, so research on this photographer has little place to start.

According to an 1881 Gazetteer , there was a photographer named L. M. Johnson who worked in Columbus, MO, an unincorporated township that at the time had only about 2000 residents and is nowhere near Columbus, KS.

There was also an L. M. Johnson working as a photographer’s helper for S. J. Morrow in Yankton, Dakota Territory, in 1880.

There was a Frank M. Johnson working in Hutchinson, KS, in 1923.

There was an R. M. Johnson, photographer in Cherryvale, KS, in 1901.

The card is in poor condition but there is a deckle edge visible, so it is probably from around 1890 or after.

Columbus (KS) Weekly Advocate - 08 Dec 1892

The above clipping comes from a Columbus, KS newspaper, adds a bit of connection or perhaps more mystery about the whereabouts of ?. M. Johnson. See the OSCAR HAINES listing for details.


Dad and six kids
Photographer: Johnson Bros.
Morris, Minn.

There were at least four photographers named Johnson in Minnesota during the cabinet card era. There is no evidence so far that any of them were related. It appears all of them were immigrants.

One of them, Jens P. Johnson married and had a son in Morris, MN, in 1892. This could be one of the “Brothers” but evidence of this has not been found.

Cabinet Card
Photographer: Jonas
Perry, O. T.

Only one photographer has been found with the surname Jonas. A New York city directory for 1915 shows Louis Jonas as photographer but this is not likely to be the photographer working in Oklahoma Territory. Oklahoma did not become a state until 1907, so this cabinet card was made prior to that.


cabinet card - standing portrait
Photographer: H. M. Judd
87 Front Street
Chicopee Falls, Mass.

cabinet card
Photographer: H. M. Judd
87 Main Street
Chicopee Falls, Mass
cabinet card
This is the reverse of the card on the left. Note the address is "Front" street. On the next card, the name is changed to "Main" street.
(See Below)
cabinet card
This is the reverse of the card on the left. Note the address is "Main" street.

Henry Melville Judd (10 Sep 1848 - 20 May 1921)

H. M. Judd was born in Whately, MA. His mother died when he was 12 and his father died when he was 14. He never married and lived in boarding houses and rented rooms all his life.

From Whatley, MA, he moved to Middlebury, MA, at age 12.
He is found in Amherst, MA, in 1870 living next door to another photographer when he was 22.
Then in 1877 he is in Springfield, MA, age 29. He sets up his own studio there over a drug store.
Here is a timeline of his studio locations based on documents found.
1877 - 1882 studio over Knox Drug store
1883 studio at 42 Front
1889 - 1890 at 87 Front
1890 - 1892 at 87 Main (street name change)
1895 - 1912 at 13 Church. Chicopee Falls, MA
1913 - 1920 unknown
1921 at 71 Market.

Using these dates the card at the left imprinted with 87 Front Street, must have been finished between about 1884 and 1890. The other card from 87 Main Street would have been done between 1890 and 1895.

Please note:
As of September 2017 this series will no longer be updated here.
All content has been transferred to a new site called
Cabinet Card Photographers
All future additions will be made there.



A few additional ways to date cabinet cards

Card stock
1866–1880: square, lightweight mount
1880–1890: square, heavy weight card stock
1890s: scalloped edges

Card colors
1866–1880:
thin, light weight card stock in white, off white or light cream; white and light colours were used in later years, but generally on heavier card stock

1880–1890:
different colors for face and back of mounts

1882–1888:
matte-finish front, with a creamy-yellow, glossy back

(From WIki)

Borders
1866–1880: red or gold rules, single and double lines
1884–1885: wide gold borders
1885–1892: gold beveled edges
1889–1896: rounded corner rule of single line
1890s on: Embossed borders and/or lettering

(From Wiki)



For more information on dating Cabinet Cards see PHOTOTREE

Lettering
1866–1879 Photographer name and address often printed small and neatly just below the image, and/or studio name printed small on back.

1880s on: Large, ornate text for photographer name and address, especially in cursive style. Studio name often takes up the entire back of the card.

Late 1880s–90s Gold text on black card stock

1890s on: embossed studio name or other embossed designs

(From Wiki)


Below are the links to the alphabetized pages in the LOST GALLERY cabinet card collection.

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

U

V

W

X

Y

Z

There are MANY photographs on each page so they might load slowly.

Go back to THE MAIN INDEX PAGE
There are now more than 8,000 photographs in the Lost Gallery.
Or try out the NEW BACK PAGE INDEX






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